Entries Tagged 'Testing Concepts' ↓

Static Testing and Dynamic Testing – Difference Between These Two Important Testing Techniques

Testing is verification and validation. We all know that it takes 2 Vs to make testing complete.

In today’s article we will shed some light on Static testing. It is also called as Verification. We will learn all about it and pay special emphasis on this, because dynamic testing often receives maximum attention and has innumerable articles detailing it out.

However, no discussion on static testing would be complete without an explanation of what its counterpart, dynamic testing means. Dynamic testing is validation, the other “V”. Dynamic testing is when you are working with the actual system (not some artifact or model that represents Continue reading →

A Beginner’s Guide to System Testing

So…do you really think it will take that huge amount of time to test, what you call system testing, even after spending lot of efforts on integration testing?

The client we recently approached for the project was not convinced about the estimation we provided for each testing effort.

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I had to chime in with an example -

Mike, I would like to elaborate our efforts and importance of system testing with an example.

Shoot, he replied.  Continue reading →

What is Difference Between Test Plan, Test Strategy, Test Case, Test Script, Test Scenario and Test Condition?

Our popular software testing questions and answers series is back again! Just to remind – in this series we answer questions asked by the readers. You can check some earlier posts in this series here and here. Got a question? Submit it in the comment section below or use the contact form.

In today’s article in this series, we are going to answer (with examples) some most commonly asked (and confusing) questions about the difference between test plan, test strategy, test case, test script, test scenario and test condition.

These questions are asked by “sasi C“.

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State Transition Testing Technique for Testing Complex Applications

In our last article, we saw ‘Cause and effect graph’ test case writing technique. Today let’s move to next dynamic test case writing method – State transition technique.

Note – The test design techniques mentioned here may seem difficult but once you get hold of it, it becomes very easy to implement and reuse, increasing productivity and test coverage.

What is State transition testing technique?

State transition technique is a dynamic testing technique, which is used when the system is defined in terms of a finite number of states and the Continue reading →

Cause and Effect Graph – Dynamic Test Case Writing Technique For Maximum Coverage with Fewer Test Cases

Dynamic Testing Techniques – Cause and Effect Graph.

Test case writing forms an integral part in testing, whether it is manual or automation. Every project is exclusive and has <n> number of test conditions that needs to be covered.

We should focus on two points whenever we write test cases. These are:
Mitigating the risk
Coverage.

This paper revolves around the second point which is “Coverage”. To be precise – Requirements Coverage.

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How to Create Requirements Traceability Matrix – Exact Process with Sample TM Template

Traceability Matrix – How to Create and Use It

Today’s session is about an important QC tool, that is either over-simplified (read overlooked) or over-emphasized – Traceability Matrix(TM).

Most often, the making, reviewing or sharing of a Traceability Matrix is not one of the primary QA process deliverables – so it is not majorly concentrated on, thus causing the under-emphasis. On the contrary, some clients expect a TM to reveal earth-shattering facets about their product (under test) and are disappointed.

“When used right, a Traceability Matrix can be your GPS for your QA journey”.

Continue reading →