Entries Tagged 'Testing best practices' ↓

What is Technical Debt and Why QA Testers Should be Concerned About It?

Technical debt is a metaphorical idea which argues that just as one may run into debt problems in finance, software organizations encounter something similar in the buildup of unfinished work during past projects and version releases/sprints.

What is Technical debt?

It represents the effort needed to fix the issues/defects that remain in the code when an application is released. In simple words – it’s the difference (in terms of bugs) between what is expected and what is delivered.

When a development team is busy working on a project and fixing bugs unfortunately, many new bugs appear. Out of Continue reading →

This Scenario Explains How Important It is to Document the Frequently Encountered Errors

Do you believe that software errors occur only once and that on being fixed they never resurface? I feel that about 30% of the errors reoccur.

In this article, I want to cover how important it is to document some of the frequently encountered errors.


Below, you will find some common areas where issues are seen and a template to document them.  Continue reading →

Continuous Integration Process: How to Improve Software Quality and Reduce Risk

In the first part of the article series, we understood the nuances of Continuous Delivery (CD) where we have production ready software at any point via continuous feedback loops. Continuous integration (CI) is the real meat behind the CD process and is the reason that makes Continuous Delivery possible.

To understand CI, let’s take the terms at face value and deduce a basic definition. The first word means “ongoing” or “frequent” and the second “merged” or “made part of”. So CI is a process where something is being “merged”-“frequently”.

Logically the next question is: What is the something being merged and where is it merged?

Continue reading →

Continuous Delivery: How to Have the Reliable Software Releases to Production at Any Time

In this two-part article series, we will focus on Continuous Delivery (CD) and Continuous Integration (CI), starting with an at length discussion on Continuous delivery today.

Software development has seen a steep outlook and approach difference to keep up with the current market trends and consumer needs. While the traditional waterfall approach was more sequential and planned, it has setbacks in terms of satisfying customer expectations of the final product.  Continue reading →

How to Deal With Bad Requirements as a Tester

The silent conference room was suffocating and everyone inside it was confused. How could we miss it, was the question everyone’s face reflected.

After all, not showing up with any relevant error when the user tries to duplicate the existing record and allowing him to do so was not a small bug- That too for an insurance company.

After deciding to nail down the issue, everyone dispersed. And while digging out, it was observed that client never mentioned anything about duplicity of records in the requirements document and therefore no one asked relevant questions or thought about it.

Continue reading →